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2017 Silver Screen Riot Awards

With the announcement of the Academy Awards nominees, we’re finally in the race to the finale of this year’s award’s seasons. Seeing that Mr. Oscar tends to get it wrong so much of the time (although this year’s nominees were fairly great across the board), we have an annual tradition of issuing our own awards to recognize the best storytelling and performances throughout the year. Since we’re not tied to any silly number of nominees, we went ahead and listed every one that we thought deserving of a mention, even if the list well exceed more than 5 or 10. You won’t find a Best Picture category here as I think that is properly summarized by our Top Ten Films segment, which I would urge you to visit if you haven’t already. With that out of the way, the SSR Award goes to… Read More

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Out in Theaters: ‘PHANTOM THREAD’ 

Merriam Webster defines sumptuous as something that is “rich, luxurious, or magnificent” and I cannot think of a better application of the word than to describe Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest feature, Phantom Thread. A marvel of filmmaking, Phantom Thread as a piece of modern art is absolutely decadent – from the luscious cinematography to the snide and sneakily funny script, the nerve-racking sound design to the rich, textured performances.  Read More

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Director Face/Off: Paul Thomas Anderson Vs. Quentin Tarantino (Part Two – Reusing Actors)

QuentinvPTAPART1
This time, Director Face/Off pits two legendary visual storytellers against each other: Paul Thomas Anderson and Quentin Tarantino. While some may disagree, the two have some stuff in common – both directors were obsessed film fanatics at very young ages, broke into the industry humbly by way of short films and co-written screenplays, and then went on to make cinematic staples like Pulp Fiction and Boogie Nights. Both directors make solid, intriguing films held up by foundations of strong, colorful characters, nonlinear narrative continuity and plenty of violence. Who does it all better, though? 


Like our former Face/Off directors, Wes Anderson and Richard Linklater, Paul Thomas Anderson and Quentin Tarantino have a thing for reusing actors. Let’s find out who reuses their talent of choice better.

Battle 2: Reusing Actors

Round One:Recently Updated9

Philip Baker Hall

Anderson Filmography: Cigarettes & Coffee, Hard Eight, Boogie Nights, Magnolia. 

Michael Madsen 

Tarantino Filmography: Reservoir Dogs, Kill Bill Vol. 1, Kill Bill Vol. 2, Sin City (Tarantino was a “guest director) 

Anderson landed the talent of Philip Baker Hall in his debut short Cigarettes & Coffee, garnering them both a cult following that amassed even more following Magnolia, and Hall’s role as game show host Jimmy Gator. Michael Madsen is most notably remembered as Mr. Blonde in Reservoir Dogs, the guy responsible for the iconic “ear scene,” in which he also dances nonchalantly to Stealers Wheel. There’s no denying Madsen’s roles in Tarantino films are quite typically the lovable badass villain, as proven by his role as Budd in the Kill Bill series.

Winner: Michael Madsen/ Tarantino 

Round Two:

Recently Updated10

Joaquin Phoenix

Anderson Filmography: The Master, Inherent Vice

Uma Thurman

Tarantino Filmography:Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill Vol. 1, Kill Bill Vol. 2 

Anderson’s work has always been deep in story and subject matter, but at one point in his career, his work went from deep to really f-ing heavy, around the time that There Will Be Blood came out. Following the two and a half hour oil-drilling epic drama came The Master, where Joaquin Phoenix plays Freddie, a drifter haunted by inner demons and PTSD who follows a leader of a religious movement. Uma Thurman’s roles as Beatrix Kiddo in the Kill Bill series and Mia Wallace in Pulp Fiction are both pretty much legendary in cinema. With rumors of a third installment to the Kill Bill series in the works, there’s just no battle here!

Winner: Uma Thurman/ Tarantino

Round Three:Recently Updated11

Philip Seymour Hoffman

Anderson Filmography: Hard Eight, Boogie Nights, Magnolia, Punch Drunk Love, The Master

Samuel L. Jackson

Tarantino Filmography: Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown, Kill Bill Vol. 2, Django Unchained 

 This is a very difficult round, due to the incredible talent of both Philip Seymour Hoffman and Samuel L. Jackson. While Jackson is a Tarantino staple, known for his righteousness, filthy yet quotable lines and just general badassity, Hoffman is just as worthy from his proven versatility and range in Anderson’s films alone.Between confessing unrequited love for Dirk in Boogie Nights or leading people into an inner circle of unconventional beliefs as a religious leader in The Master, Hoffman gives incredible, real performances. RIP Philip Seymour Hoffman!

Winner: Philip Seymour Hoffman/ Anderson

Subjective Winner: Tarantino Reuses Actors Better

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Join us next week for the next battle,  and check out prior segments:

Battle #1: Tell Offs

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Director Face/Off: Paul Thomas Anderson Vs. Quentin Tarantino (Part One- Tell Offs)

QuentinvPTAPART1

This time, Director Face/Off pits two legendary visual storytellers against each other: Paul Thomas Anderson and Quentin Tarantino. While some may disagree, the two have some stuff in common – both directors were obsessed film fanatics at very young ages, broke into the industry humbly by way of short films and co-written screenplays, and then went on to make cinematic staples like Pulp Fiction and Boogie Nights. Both directors make solid, intriguing films held up by foundations of strong, colorful characters, nonlinear narrative continuity and plenty of violence. Who does it all better, though? 


Read More